Regimental Sketches

69 sketches - 5 Confederate Tennessee and 64 Tennessee Confederate units


1st Confederate (Tennessee) | 2nd Confederate (Tennessee) | 3rd Confederate (Tennessee)
4th Confederate (Tennessee) | 5th Confederate (Tennessee)

1st Tennessee (Confederate) | 2nd Tennessee (Confederate) | 3rd Tennessee (Confederate)
4th Tennessee (Confederate) | 5th Tennessee (Confederate) | 6th Tennessee (Confederate)
7th Tennessee (Confederate) | 8th Tennessee (Confederate) | 9th Tennessee (Confederate)
10th Tennessee (Confederate) | 11th Tennessee (Confederate) | 12th Tennessee (Confederate)
13th Tennessee (Confederate) |14th Tennessee (Confederate) | 15th Tennessee (Confederate)
16th Tennessee (Confederate) | 17th Tennessee (Confederate) | 18th Tennessee (Confederate)
19th Tennessee (Confederate) | 20th Tennessee (Confederate) | 21st Tennessee (Confederate)
22nd Tennessee (Confederate) | 23rd Tennessee (Confederate) | 24th Tennessee (Confederate)
25th Tennessee (Confederate) | 26thTennessee (Confederate) | 27th Tennessee (Confederate)
28th Tennessee (Confederate) | 29th Tennessee (Confederate) | 30th Tennessee (Confederate)
31st Tennessee (Confederate, West Tennessee) | 31st Tennessee (Confederate, East Tennessee)
32nd Tennessee (Confederate) | 33rd Tennessee (Confederate)
34th Tennessee (Confederate) | 35th Tennessee (Confederate) | 36thTennessee (Confederate)
37th Tennessee (Confederate) | 38th Tennessee (Confederate) | 39th Tennessee (Confederate)
40th Tennessee (Confederate) | 41st Tennessee (Confederate) | 42nd Tennessee (Confederate)
43rd Tennessee (Confederate) | 44th Tennessee (Confederate) | 45th Tennessee (Confederate)
46thTennessee (Confederate) | 47th Tennessee (Confederate) | 48th Tennessee (Confederate, Voorhees)
48th Tennessee (Confederate, Nixon) | 49th Tennessee (Confederate) | 50th Tennessee (Confederate)
51st Tennessee (Confederate) | 52nd Tennessee (Confederate) | 53rd Tennessee (Confederate)
54th Tennessee (Confederate) | 55th Tennessee (Confederate) | 59thTennessee (Confederate)
60th Tennessee (Confederate) | 61st Tennessee (Confederate) | 62nd Tennessee (Confederate)
63rd Tennessee (Confederate) | 84th Tennessee (Confederate) | 154th Tennessee (Confederate)


Source: Page 561 - 595, Goodspeed's History of East Tennessee, 1887.
The First Confederate (Tennessee) Regiment, probably the first raised in the State, was organized at Winchester April 27, 1861, and was raised in the counties of Franklin, Lincoln, Coffee and Grundy. Upon the organization Peter Turney was elected colonel. The regiment was ordered to Virginia, where, at Lynchburg, May 7, it was mustered into the service of the Confederate Government. It saw active service from the start, and participated in the earlier engagements of the war in that department. About the middle of February, 1862, it was attached to Anderson's brigade, the other regiments being the Seventh and Fourteenth Tennessee. This was known as the "Tennessee Brigade." This regiment served in nearly all the battles of the Army of Northern Virginia: Cheat Mountain, Winchester, Manassas (under Gen. Joe Johnston, near Yorktown), Seven Pines (the first real battle, losing heavily, including its brigade commander, Gen. Hatton, who was succeeded by Gen. Archer), Mechanicsville, Gains' Mills, Frazier's Farm, Culpepper Court House, Second Bull Run, Centerville, Fredericksburg (where Col. Turney commanded the brigade and was severely wounded), Chancellorsville, Gettysburg (again losing heavily and displaying great gallantry in the famous charge on Cemetery Hill), Falling Water, Bristoe Station, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg and many others, losing in the aggregate two-thirds of those engaged. It was surrendered at Appomattox in April, 1865. Col. Turney had been wounded, and was in Florida at the time of the surrender. This was one of the best regiments from the State.

The First Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Middle Tennessee, in April, 1861, immediately after the fall of Sumter, and was organized with George Maney as colonel, and was, July 0, transferred to Virginia, where, with the Seventh and Fourteenth Regiments, it was brigaded under Gen. Anderson. The trip to Mingo Flats was the first hardship, and near Cheat Pass the regiment was first under fire. It participated in the movement at Big Sewell Mountain, and prepared winter quarters at Huntersville, but December 8 moved to Winchester, and early in January, 1862, amid intense suffering and cold, moved to Romney; thence back to Winchester early in February. After the fall of Fort Donelson, the First was ordered to the command of Gen. A S Johnston. Part was left at Knoxville, and part joined Johnston. The latter, the left wing, participated in the battle of Shiloh on the second day, but the right wing had been detained for want of transportation. After Shiloh the wings were reunited and late in April the First was reorganized, H R Field becoming colonel, vice Maney promoted. Hawkins' battalion was added to the regiment as Company L. The First was in Maney's brigade of Cheatham's division. July 11, 1862, it left Tupelo, and via Chattanooga moved into Kentucky, reaching Harrodsburg October 6. It fought on the extreme right at Perryville, doing gallant service and losing over one-half its men killed and wounded. It captured four twelve pound guns and had fifty men killed. It retreated south with Bragg, and in December was consolidated with the Twenty-seventh Tennessee, and later was engaged in the battle of Murfreesboro, where it lost heavily. It moved south, and in September participated in the battle of Chickamauga with conspicuous daring. Late in November it was engaged in the battle of Missionary Ridge, and then retreated with the Confederate Army. From Dalton to Atlanta the regiment was constantly engaged in all the memorable movements of that campaign, fighting desperately at "Dead Angle." In front of the First were found 385 Federal dead. The First lost twenty-seven killed and wounded. It fought on the 20th and 22d of July, and at Jonesboro August 19 and 20. It moved north with Hood, fighting at Spring Hill, Franklin and Nashville, and then retreated, moving to North Carolina, where it participated at Bentonville, and finally surrendered April 26, 1865.

The Second Confederate (Tennessee) Regiment was organized May 5, 1861, with William B Bate, colonel, and was mustered into the Confederate service at Lynchburg, Va., early in May, 1861. It was raised in Middle Tennessee. It occupied various positions until June 1, when, at Acquia Creek, it supported Confederate batteries in an engagement with Federal war ships. It made a forced march to assist Beauregard at Manassas, and on the 21st was marched seven miles at a double-quick, a portion of the time under a heavy artillery fire. It occupied Evansport and erected batteries, etc., until February, 1862, when it re-enlisted for three years and took a furlough of sixty days. It joined the Confederate forces at Huntsville, Ala., late in March, 1862; thence moved to Corinth, and April 6 and 7 was hotly engaged at Shiloh in the brigade of Gen. P R Cleburne, where it lost in killed and wounded the appalling number of 235 men. Col. Bate was severely wounded and was immediately promoted. After this sanguinary battle the regiment was reorganized. It skirmished around Corinth, retreated to Tupelo, and then with its brigade was moved to Knoxville, Tenn., thence through Wilson's Gap into Kentucky, to cut off Gen. Morgan's retreat from Cumberland Gap. August 30, 1862, it was desperately engaged at Richmond, Ky., losing many men. It then moved to Latonia Springs; thence to Shelbyville, threatening Louisville; thence fought at Perryville, its commander being Sr.-Capt. C P Moore. It then moved to Knoxville, where W D Robison was elected colonel. December 31, 1862, it fought at Murfreesboro, suffering heavily. IT wintered at Tullahoma and in the spring of 1863 did guard duty, skirmishing several times. Later it moved to Bridgeport and was engaged at McLemore's Cove, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and Ringgold Gap. It did outpost duty during the winter of 1863-64, and in the spring retreated with Johnston from Dalton to Atlanta, participating in the engagements at Resaca, New Hope Church, "Dead Angle" and Atlanta. At Peach Tree Creek two of its companies were captured. It fought at Jonesboro, where the dashing, gallant Maj. Driver was killed, and at Lovejoy's Station. It moved north with Gen. Hood and at the battles of Franklin and Nashville suffered heavy loss. It retreated to Tupelo, was transferred to North Carolina, fought at Bentonville, losing its commander, Wilkerson. April 26, 1865, it was surrendered by Gen. Johnston at Greensboro, NC, to Gen. Sherman.

The Second Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Memphis and organized about the 1st of May, 1861, with J K Walker, colonel, and reported to Gen. J L T Sneed at Randolph. Later it participated in the movement northward and fought in the battle of Belmont, November 7, with considerable loss. It returned southward occupying several points, and finally from Corinth, in April, 1862, moved up and engaged the enemy at Shiloh, in which bloody engagement it lost severely. Soon after this it was consolidated with the Twenty-first Tennessee Regiment to form the Fifth Confederate Regiment.

The Third Confederate (Tennessee) Regiment was organized at Knoxville, May 29, 1861, with John C Vaughn, colonel, and July 2, 1861, left for the field in Virginia, and two days later was mustered into the Confederate service. The first engagement was June 19, when Companies I and K captured New River Bridge and two cannons. July 21 it was engaged at the first battle of Manassas, and then did picket duty. February 16, 1862, it moved to East Tennessee, and April 1 skirmished with guerrillas in Scott County, Tenn. May 1 it was reorganized at Big Creek Gap, Vaughn being re-elected colonel. August 6, 1862, the regiment defeated three regiments of Federals at Tazewell, Tenn., losing, 7 killed and 31 wounded. It participated in the siege of Cumberland Gap; thence moved with Bragg into Kentucky, and here N J Lillard became colonel, vice Vaughn promoted. In December, 1862, the regiment with three others of East Tennessee under Gen. Reynolds, started for Vicksburg, arriving January 5, 1863; took an active part in the surrounding engagements and surrendered with Pemberton July 4. July 10 the troops were paroled, and October 19 were formally exchanged. It was assigned to Longstreet's command and saw service around Knoxville. A portion of the regiment in Virginia, during the summer of 1864, lost at Piedmont forty-seven killed and wounded. It participated at Bull's Gap, Greeneville and Morristown, and surrendered May 9, 1865.

The Third Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was organized in Giles County May 16, 1861, with five companies from Giles, three from Maury, one from Lawrence and one from Lewis, and was placed in command of Col. J C Brown. The Third, after occupying camp of instruction, was, about the middle of September, 1861, sent to Gen. Buckner's command at Bowling Green, Ky. February 8, 1862, it reached Fort Donelson where it began work. It was commanded by Lieut.-Col. Gordon, Col. Brown having charge of a brigade. During the siege of Fort Donelson the Third was prominently engaged. It made several sallies and charges with great spirit and considerable loss. It was surrendered with the fort, having lost 13 killed, 56 wounded and 722 captured. The prisoners were taken North September 23, 1862; 607 were exchanged and immediately (September 26, 1862, at Jackson, Miss.) reorganized with C H Walker, colonel. It took the field, skirmished at Springdale, Miss., fought at Chickasaw Bayou, losing 2 men, did good service at Port Hudson; thence in May, 1863, moved to Raymond, where, in the fiercest engagement of the war, it lost the appalling number of 32 killed on the field, 76 wounded and 68 captured. After this it was engaged at Chickamauga, losing 24 killed, 62 wounded and 7 prisoners; and at Missionary Ridge, losing 3 wounded and 1 captured. It participated at Resaca, New Hope Church, near Marietta, around Atlanta, at Jonesboro, and in numerous lesser engagements. It went north with Hood, to Franklin and Nashville, and then moved to North Carolina, where at Greensboro, April 26, 1865, it was surrendered. This was one of the best of the Tennessee regiments.

The Fourth Confederate (Tennessee) Regiment was organized at Camp Sneed, near Knoxville, in the month of July, 1861, and comprised companies from the counties of Davidson, Rutherford, Williamson and others, and from Alabama, and was commanded by Col. W M Churchwell. The lieutenant-colonel was James McMurray, and the major, Lewis. This regiment first saw service in East Tennessee. After various movements it joined Gen. Bragg on the campaign into Kentucky, where, at Perryville, it was engaged. It marched southward with the army and participated in the furious charges at Murfreesboro, sustaining severe loss, and later, at the splendid Confederate victory at Chickamauga, bore its full share of the bloody work. It was at Missionary Ridge and at all the various movements of Gen. Johnston in the Georgia campaign, fighting often and losing heavily. It marched back on Hood's Tennessee, campaign and participated at Nashville and Franklin; thence marched to North Carolina with the gallant Army of the Tennessee, where it surrendered in the spring of 1865.

The Fourth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in the counties of Dyer, Obion, Lauderdale, Gibson, Tipton and Hardeman, and was organized May 18, 1861, with R P Neely, colonel. It moved to Memphis May 20; thence up to Randolph; thence to Fort Pillow July 18; thence to New Madrid, and November 7, at Belmont, served as a reserve. February 4, 1862, at Island No. 10, it was under the fire of Federal gun-boats. It reached Memphis March 20; thence moved to Corinth, and on the 6th of April began the brilliant fight at Shiloh. In one charge, when it captured a fine battery, it lost 31 killed and 160 wounded, and during the battle nearly half of those engaged. The Fourth was reorganized April 25, with O F Strahl, colonel. In July it moved to Chattanooga and August 17 started on the Kentucky campaign, passing through Sparta, Gainesboro, Munfordville, Bardstown and Harrodsburg. At Perryville, in the afternoon of the 8th, it participated in a brilliant charge on the Federals, losing about one-third of those engaged. It moved south via Knoxville and Tullahoma to Murfreesboro, where it was hotly engaged December 31. In July, 1863, A J Kellar became colonel. At Chickamauga, September 18 and 19, the Fourth fought gallantly, and November 26 participated in the severe contest on Missionary Ridge, losing nearly one-third of its men. Beginning at Dalton in May, 1864, the Fourth was under fire sixty days in the movement toward Atlanta, fighting at Dug Gap, Mill Creek Gap, Resaca, Ellsbury Mountain, Kenesaw, Atlanta and Jonesboro, suffering severe loss. At Spring Hill and Franklin and Nashville the Fourth was gallantly engaged. After this the regiment moved to North Carolina, fought at Bentonville and April 26, 1865, surrendered at Greensboro.

The Fifth Confederate (Tennessee) Regiment was formed from the Second and the Twenty-first Tennessee Regiments at Tupelo, Miss., about the 1st of June, 1862, with J A Smith, colonel. About August 1 it moved to near Chattanooga. It moved north with Gen. Bragg on the Kentucky campaign, skirmishing several times and assisting in the capture of Fort Denham at Munfordville. Returning south from Bardstown the Fifth fought desperately at Perryville October 8, losing many valuable men. It continued on to Knoxville; thence to Tullahoma and Eagleville, and December 31 commenced in the brilliant Confederate achievement at Murfreesboro. The regiment displayed great gallantry and after the battle moved to Tullahoma, where it wintered; then to Wartrace and in June, 1863, to Hoover's Gap, and then to Chattanooga. In September it fought with conspicuous gallantry at bloody Chickamauga, losing heavily of its best and bravest. Later, at Missionary Ridge, the Fifth held its position on the right until left alone. From Dalton to Atlanta it was constantly engaged, losing many in killed, wounded and prisoners. It moved north with Gen. Hood and fought as it never had before at Franklin in that hottest engagement of the war, where it was reduced to twenty-one men. At Nashville it fought on the right and then moved south. It was consolidated at Corinth with other skeleton regiments and moved to North Carolina, where it participated at Bentonville and was finally surrendered April 26, 1865. Much of the time of service the regiment was in the brigade of the gallant and beloved Cleburne.

The Fifth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Henry County (a few in Benton and in Carroll) and organized at Paris May 20, 1861, with W E Travis, colonel, with twelve companies. It occupied Humboldt and Union City until September 4, 1861; then moved to Columbus, Ky., and at the battle of Belmont supported the artillery. It formed part of Stewart's brigade, Cheatham's division, Polk's corps. When Donelson fell the regiment moved to New Madrid, where several skirmishes were had with the Federals. The Fifth marched to Corinth, and April 6 and 7 fought with notable bravery at Shiloh, losing heavily. It then moved to Tupelo; thence to Chattanooga. In September it moved on the Kentucky expedition, and at Perryville sustained a heavy loss. For the Fifth this was one of the sharpest fights of the war. It then moved via Knoxville to Murfreesboro, where it was consolidated with the Fourth under Col. Lamb, and was desperately engaged at the battle of the latter name. In the movement south it skirmished at Guy's Gap. The Fifth fought in the bloody battle of Chickamauga for two days, and at Missionary Ridge, in November, 1863, was one of the last to leave the ridge, and was then used to cover the retreat. It checked the victorious Federals until 2 AM the next morning, though overwhelmed with numbers. On the retreat it fought all the way to Ringgold Gap. It wintered at Dalton, and in the spring, on the Atlanta campaign, fought almost continuously to Atlanta. Col. Lamb was mortally wounded at Ellsbury Ridge, and was succeeded by A J Kellar. It moved north with Hood, fought at Franklin and Nashville, retreated south, and in the spring of 1865 a mere remnant was surrendered in North Carolina.

The Sixth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Madison, Fayette and Haywood, nine of the eleven companies in Madison, and was organized in May, 1861, by the election of W H Stephens, colonel, and was mustered in for one year on May 15. May 26 it moved to Union City, where it was thoroughly disciplined. It moved to Columbus, Ky., but was not engaged at Belmont. After the surrender of Fort Donelson the regiment moved south to Corinth. April 6 and 7, 1862, the Sixth was first engaged at Shiloh, having to endure the trial of a severe artillery fire before being engaged. About 11 o'clock of the 6th it was ordered to charge a battery, which it did in gallant style, meeting with a terrific fire, which cut down 250 men. It did splendid work on both of those memorable days, losing over one-third of those engaged. It returned to Corinth, in the vicinity of which it participated in several hot skirmishes, losing severely. It then moved to Chattanooga, and in September started on the campaign into Kentucky. At Perryville, October 8, the Sixth, under Col. G C Porter, occupied the center of Maney's gallant brigade, and lost over 150 killed, wounded and missing. The regiment was next engaged at Murfreesboro, having previously been consolidated with the Ninth Tennessee, under Col. Hurt. It brought on the battle and was then held in reserve, but was rapidly moved from point to point, being much of the time under heavy artillery fire. Next at Chickamauga the Sixth, under Col. Porter, did noble work in the fiercest of the fight, losing over a third of its men. At Missionary Ridge it was prominently engaged, and was one of the last to leave the field. It wintered at Dalton, and in the spring of 1864 fought at Kenesaw, "Dead Angle," siege of Atlanta, Jonesboro, Lovejoy and Franklin, November 30, 1864, where it was immortalized. It fought at Nashville, Spring Hill, Elk River, and finally surrendered in North Carolina.

The Seventh Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Sumner, Wilson, Smith and DeKalb Counties, and was organized May 25, 1861, with Robert Hatton, colonel. It remained at Camp Trousdale, Sumner County, until in July, when it moved to Virginia, and with the First and Fourteenth Tennessee Regiments, was constituted Anderson's Brigade. It skirmished on the Parkersburg road as part of Loring's division of Jackson's corps, and at Hancock, Md., and later the First Confederate (Turney's Tennessee) took the place of the First Tennessee (Confederate), the whole being called the "First Tennessee Brigade." The Seventh participated in the Yorktown campaign, and later Goodner was commissioned colonel, Hatton brigadier, and G W Smith major-general. May 30, 1862, at Seven Pines, the Seventh, in a desperate charge, lost eight captains, half its privates, and Brig.-Gen. Hatton. In the "seven days" battles it fought with notable daring and dash at Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mills, Frazier's Farm, Malvern Hill and elsewhere, losing many valuable men. It lost heavily at Culpepper Court House, and at Bull Run Company H lost all its men killed or wounded, a remarkable circumstance. At Centerville, Bolivar Heights and Antietam the Seventh fought with conspicuous valor, losing at the latter battle over thirty of less than 100 engaged. At Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville it sustained severe loss amid brilliant action on the field. At Gettysburg it commenced the attack, losing the first man on the Confederate side, being held in reserve the second day, and conjointly with Pickett's division, on the third day, forming the column which made the historic and headlong charge on Cemetery Hill. In the Wilderness, at Spottsylvania, at Petersburg, on Weldon Railroad, at Fort Archer and in a multitude of skirmishes, the Seventh bore an honorable and conspicuous part. Forty-seven sad-hearted, noble men surrendered at Appomattox.

The Eighth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in the counties of Marshall, Lincoln, Overton, Jackson and Smith, and was organized at Camp Harris, Lincoln County, in May, 1861, and was mustered into the provisional army of Tennessee by Col. D R Smythe. Later in May it moved to Camp Trousdale. Its colonel was Alfred S Fulton. It moved first to West Virginia, where it operated for some time, skirmishing occasionally with some loss. Later it returned to Tennessee, and finally joined Bragg's Kentucky campaign, and was engaged October 8, 1862, at Perryville with loss. It moved south and participated in the hottest of the fight at Murfreesboro, losing nearly half the number engaged in killed and wounded. After this it participated in all the brilliant movements of the Army of the Tennessee --- at Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, on the Atlanta and Hood's Tennessee campaigns, fighting with distinguished valor, and losing its bravest and best. At Murfreesboro it was in Donelson's brigade of Cheatham's division. At Chickamauga it was in Wright's brigade, and was commanded by Col. John H Anderson. After long and gallant service it was surrendered to Gen. Sherman in North Carolina.

The Ninth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment, was raised in Haywood, Fayette, Tipton, Hardeman, Shelby, Lauderdale, Weakley and Obion Counties, and was organized at Camp Beauregard, Jackson, May 22, 1861, with H L Douglas, colonel. It was disciplined at Union City where many died of measles. In August it moved to Columbus, Ky.; in October to Mayfield; thence back to Columbus, and in March, 1862, to Corinth. From Bethel Station it marched sixteen miles to engage the enemy at Shiloh, and was in the hottest of the fight, losing about sixty men. C S Hurt soon became colonel, and in August the Ninth marched to Chattanooga, and in September northward on the Kentucky campaign. At Perryville, October 8, it fought its severest and most desperate fight of the war, losing 52 killed and 76 wounded. It was then transferred via Knoxville to Murfreesboro, where it was consolidated with the Sixth, and where December 31, it sustained heavy loss on a bloody field. Soon after this, Col. Porter succeeded Col. Hurt. The Ninth fell back with the army to Chattanooga; thence to Chickamauga, where September 19 and 20 it did brilliant service, losing 35 killed and 40 wounded. At Missionary Ridge it fought in reserve, and then fell slowly back to Dalton, where it wintered. On the Atlanta campaign, beginning in May, 1864, it fought at Resaca, Dallas, Kenesaw, Dead Angle, Peach Tree Creek and at Atlanta, where it lost many officers and was in numerous skirmishes. It participated in the engagements at Jonesboro, Lovejoy, Dalton and Decatur, without serious loss; and at bloody Franklin fought with great fierceness, sustaining a loss of one-fourth its men, and at Nashville suffered much amid gallant action before an overwhelming force. As Company E of the First Consolidated Tennessee Regiment, the Ninth marched to North Carolina, where April 26, 1865, it surrendered with forty men.

The Tenth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Davidson, Montgomery and Giles Counties, and was organized at Fort Henry, in May, 1861, with Adolphus Heiman, colonel. It was disciplined at Fort Henry, and during the investment lost seven men killed and wounded by the bursting of a 64-pounder. At Fort Donelson, where it retreated, it was under constant and destructive musketry and artillery fire for three days, and became prisoners of war February 16, 1862. Here it earned the designation "Bloody Tenth." September 24 it was exchanged, and October 2 reorganized at Clinton, Miss. R W McGavock succeeded Col. Heiman, who had died. In December, in Gregg's brigade, it helped defeat Sherman at Chickasaw Bayou. January 3 it moved to Port Hudson, where March 13, at night, it sustained a heavy bombardment by Federal gun-boats. May 7 it fought at Jackson, and May 12 brilliantly at Raymond, losing Col. McGavock. The Tenth was consolidated with the Thirtieth under Col. Turner. After the capitulation of Vicksburg it joined Bragg at Ringgold, and September 19 and 20 at fierce Chickamauga lost 224 men killed and wounded out of 328 engaged, a result with scarcely a parallel in the annals of war. The brigade was broken up on the death of Gen. Gregg, and the Tenth was transferred to Tyler's brigade. At Missionary Ridge the regiment fought hotly, being one of the last to leave the field. In May, 1864, it began the southward movement, fighting with conspicuous bravery at Rocky Face Ridge, Ringgold Gap, Buzzard Roost, Resaca, New Hope Church; Pine Mountain, Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, Decatur (July 22), Atlanta and Jonesboro, where Col. Grace was mortally wounded. In Hood's campaign into Tennessee it participated in the awful charges at Franklin and the stubborn fighting at Nashville. It then moved to Bentonville, NC, and surrendered at Greensboro.

The Eleventh Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Davidson, Humphreys, Dickson, Robertson and Hickman Counties, and was organized May 22, 1861, at Camp Cheatham, with J E Rains as colonel. Late in July it was ordered into East Tennessee, and in October was moved into Kentucky with Gen. Zollicoffer. At "Wild Cat" it lost nine killed and wounded, and then guarded Cumberland Gap until the early summer of 1862. It moved south, skirmishing at Walden's Ridge, losing by capture its colonel, Gordon. After sundry movements it joined Bragg at Harrodsburg, thence moved south via Knoxville to Murfreesboro, where the Eleventh fought its first pitched battle with splendid dash and intrepidity, losing many men, among whom was Col. Gordon, severely wounded. Gen. Rains was killed on the field. After this the Eleventh was assigned to the Tennessee Brigade of Gen. Preston Smith, comprising the Twelfth, Thirteenth, Twenty-ninth, Forty-seventh and One Hundred and Fifty-fourth. It spent the summer of 1863 as Chattanooga, and in September participated in the bloody battle of Chickamauga with great bravery and severe loss. At Missionary Ridge it fought desperately, resisting the furious charges of the Federals for hours, and until flanked. Four regimental color-bearers were shot down and Maj. Green was mortally wounded. In the Atlanta campaign, in 1864, it was engaged at Resaca, Calhoun, New Hope Church, Dead Angle, Kenesaw, Peach Tree Creek, Sugar Creek and elsewhere, losing in the aggregate heavily, and invariably displaying wonderful dash and pluck. At Jonesboro it lost Col. Long. In the awful battle of Franklin and again at Nashville it bore a distinguished part. It was at Bentonville, NC, and April 26, 1865, surrendered at Greensboro. About the beginning of Hood's Tennessee campaign it was consolidated with the Twenty-ninth Regiment.

The Twelfth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Gibson, Dyer, Carroll, Fulton and Hickman Counties, Tenn., and Graves County, Ky., and was mustered in at Jackson, May 28, 1861, R M Russell becoming colonel. It was thoroughly fitted for the field at Trenton and Union City, and in September moved to Columbus< Ky., and November 7 took active part in the battle of Belmont, T H Bell, commanding, losing about thirty killed and wounded. Soon after the surrender of Fort Donelson it was transferred to Corinth, and April 6 and 7 participated in the headlong victory at Shiloh with severe loss, Col. Bell receiving dangerous wounds. In May 1862, it was reorganized with Bell as colonel, and was consolidated with the Twenty-second. It was moved to Chattanooga; thence detached to Kirby Smith, at Knoxville; thence marched to Kentucky, where at Richmond it defeated the enemy with loss. It joined Bragg at Harrodsburg, was in reserve at Perryville, returned to Knoxville and was consolidated with the Forty-seventh. It was then transferred to Murfreesboro where it bore a gallant part, leaving its gallant dead thick on the field. At Chickamauga, in September, and at Missionary Ridge, in November, it distinguished itself on the field by its impetuous charges and adamantine stands. Again in 1864 at Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, Adairsville, New Hope Church, Kenesaw, "Dead Angle," Peach Tree Creek, Decatur and Atlanta, it bore its heroic part. At Jonesboro and Lovejoy Station it suffered severely, and in the dreadful slaughter at Franklin, and in the dogged and desperate fighting at Nashville it fought with its accustomed dash and courage. It made the dark and sorrowful march to the Carolinas, participated at Bentonville and surrendered at Greensboro, NC, April 26, 1865, with fifty men.

The Thirteenth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Fayette, Shelby, Gibson, McNairy and Dyer Counties, Tenn., and Marshall County, Miss., and was mustered in at Jackson June 3, 1861, J V Wright becoming colonel. It moved to Randolph and joined Sneed's brigade. After occupying various stations it moved in September to Columbus, Ky., where on the 10th it was brigaded with the Twelfth and Twenty-first Regiments, under Col. Russell. November 7, at Belmont, it was desperately engaged driving the enemy back to his boats, but losing the enormous number of 149 killed and wounded out of 400 engaged. Soon after this A J Vaughn succeeded Wright as colonel. March 19, 1862, it reach Corinth, and April 6 and 7 fought with desperate valor at Shiloh, losing 112 killed and wounded. It was then reorganized and a company from LaGrange was added. Early in August it moved to Chattanooga; was detached and sent to Gen. Cleburne, at Knoxville; thence marched into Kentucky and assisted in severely defeating the Federals at Richmond. It was in reserve at Perryville; thence moved to Murfreesboro via Knoxville and Tullahoma. At the furious battle of Murfreesboro it lost 110 killed and wounded out of 226 engaged. At Chickamauga in September, 1863, and Missionary Ridge in November, it displayed its usual desperation and valor. In the Georgia campaign it was honorably and gallantly engaged in all the principal battles to Atlanta, suffering in the aggregate severely, and in the Tennessee campaign, at Spring Hill, fierce Franklin and Nashville sustained further and sorrowful losses. Sadly the skeleton regiment joined Johnson's army in North Carolina, where at Bentonville it surrendered.

The Fourteenth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Montgomery, Robertson and Stewart Counties, and was organized at Camp Duncan, Clarksville, in May, 1861, under Col. W A Forbes. About the middle of July it was transferred to Virginia, where it was brigaded with the First and the Seventh, under Gen. S R Anderson. In the harrassing Cheat Mountain expedition, it suffered intensely and was first under fire. During the winter of 1861-62, it participated in the campaigns around Romney, Winchester, and the bombardment of Hancock. From this date it was in all the historical movements of the Army of Northern Virginia. May 31, 1862, it fought at Seven Pines with great bravery, losing heavily. At Chickahominy, Cold Harbor, Gaines' Mills, Malvern Hill, Frazier's Farm and elsewhere it left its gallant dead on the bloody fields. Again at Cedar Mountain, second Manassas (where Col. Forbes was killed), Chantilly, Harper's Ferry, Antietam, Shepardstown, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville (May, 1863) it bore a distinguished and honorable part, leaving its best blood on the ever memorable fields. Late in June, 1863, the army moved into Pennsylvania, where at Gettysburg, on the first day, the Fourteenth fought with desperate valor and heroic achievements, sustaining the loss of many of its best soldiers. On the 3d of July its brigade and pickets made the memorable and brilliant charge on Cemetery Ridge. This extraordinary charge has no superior in the annals of war. Again at Falling Waters, Bristow Station, in the bloody Wilderness, at fearful Spottsylvania, at Cold Harbor, Petersburg, the defenses of Richmond and elsewhere, it sustained its heroic record. In April, 1865, the remnant of this war-scarred regiment laid down its dripping arms at Appomattox.

The Fifteenth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised mainly in Shelby County and at McKenzie, and was organized at Jackson June 7, 1861, under Col. Charles M Carroll. Later several companies withdrew and were succeeded by others from Shelby County and Paducah, Ky. After occupying various positions it finally participated in the battle of Belmont, where it suffered slight loss. In March, 1862, it moved south from Columbus, Ky., and finally, April 6 and 7, from Bethel Station, near Corinth, fought in the bloody battle of Shiloh where it lost the fearful number of nearly 200 killed and wounded, receiving high praise for its dash and daring. It then returned to Tupelo where it was reorganized, and later was moved via Chattanooga northward on the Kentucky campaign, fighting in the severe contest of Perryville, where in a hand-to-hand encounter it assisted in capturing a stone wall. It moved south via Knoxville to Murfreesboro, in which battle it further distinguished itself. Later it was consolidated with the Thirty-seventh Regiment, Tyler of the Fifteenth taking command, which occasioned much ill-feeling during the remainder of the war. It moved back to Chattanooga, thence to Chickamauga, where in September, 1863, it was hotly engaged, thence to Missionary Ridge in November, sustaining in both actions heavy loss. It followed the fortunes of the Georgia campaign, fighting in all the principal battles with splendid courage and severe loss. In Hood's unfortunate campaign into Tennessee, it engaged fiercely in the actions of Franklin and Nashville, and finally marched to North Carolina, where it surrendered.

The Sixteenth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised mainly on the Cumberland Table-land, in and around Putnam County, and was mustered in June 9 at Camp Trousdale, Sumner County, with John H Savage, colonel. Late in July it moved to Virginia, where it was brigaded with the Eighth under Gen. Donelson. The first severe hardship and the first engagement was on the Cheat Mountain expedition. It participated in the harrassing expedition to Little Sewell Mountain. In December, 1861, it was transferred to Port Royal, opposite Beaufort Island, where it did valuable guard duty until after Shiloh, when it reported at Corinth and joined Bragg's campaign into Kentucky, where at Perryville it fought its first severe battle with great pluck and intrepidity. It then returned and participated gallantly in the precipitous charges at Murfreesboro. It then moved south and in September fought with conspicuous courage at dreadful Chickamauga, and later sustained for hours the shock of the Federal Army at Missionary Ridge, losing heavily in both actions. In 1864, on the Georgia campaign, it fought at Rocky Face Ridge, Kenesaw, Resaca, Peach Tree Creek and around Atlanta, losing many in the aggregate and sustaining its fine record. Again at Jonesboro, and at that hottest battle of the civil war --- Franklin --- and again at Nashville, it poured the blood of its bravest on the ensanguined fields. With heavy hearts the skeleton remnant of the gallant Sixteenth marched down to North Carolina where it finally surrendered.

The Seventeenth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Bedford, Marshall, Franklin, Jackson and Putnam Counties, and with T W Newman, colonel, was mustered in May 5, 1861. It was disciplined at Camp Trousdale and late in July was transferred to Virginia, but in August returned to East Tennessee. It joined Zollicoffer's Kentucky campaign and at the battle of Rock Castle in half an hour lost 11 killed and 27 wounded. Again it participated in the battle of Fishing Creek (where Gen. Zollicoffer was killed), with the loss of 10 killed and 36 wounded. February 19, 1862, it reached Murfreesboro; thence moved to northern Mississippi, where it participated in the siege of Corinth. In May, T C H Miller became colonel, but was soon succeeded by Albert S Marks. It was transferred to Chattanooga early in August, and in September moved into Kentucky with Bragg, fighting stubbornly at Perryville; thence moved south with the army and December 31 was engaged with magnificent courage at Murfreesboro, losing the extraordinary number of 246 killed and wounded. Later it was engaged at Hoover's Gap, and in September, 1863, at the fearful contest of Chickamauga lost 145 killed and wounded. It soon moved north with Longstreet against Knoxville; assisted in the assault on Fort Loudon; lost 10 men killed and wounded at Bean's Station; and passed the winter of 1863-64 in East Tennessee, suffering incredibly. In May, 1864, it moved to Petersburg, Va., and assaulted the enemy at Drury Bluff May 16, losing 12 killed and 50 wounded. It fought in numerous skirmishes around Richmond, and February 5, 1865, sustained considerable loss at Hatcher's Run. April 2 it fought its last battle on the defenses of Petersburg, losing severely, over half its men being captured. It surrendered at Appomattox April 9.

The Eighteenth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was formed at Camp Trousdale June 11, 1861, of companies from Rutherford, Bedford, Davidson, Wilson, Cannon, Sumner and Cheatham Counties, with J B Palmer, colonel. September 17 it moved to Bowling Green, Ky., and February 8, 1862, advanced to the relief of Fort Donelson. At the siege two companies of the Eighteenth were the first to engage the enemy. After hard fighting the regiment was surrendered February 16. After about six months it was exchanged and was reorganized at Jackson, Miss., with Palmer as colonel. It was soon transferred to Knoxville to invade Kentucky, but instead was moved to Murfreesboro and brigaded with the Twenty-sixth and the Thirty-second Regiments and others, which last were soon replaced with the Forty-fifth Tennessee. At Murfreesboro it participated in one of the most famous and brilliant charges of history with severe loss. Col. Palmer received three wounds. in September, 1863, at Chickamauga, it distinguished itself by its furious fighting and desperate losses. Col. Palmer was again dangerously wounded. Again at Missionary Ridge it fought with its accustomed gallantry and loss. It wintered at Dalton, and, in 1864, resisted the advance of the enemy on numerous bloody fields on the way to Atlanta. Palmer was commissioned brigadier-general and given a brigade of the Third, Eighteenth, Thirty-second and Forty-fifth Regiments. W R Butler became colonel of the Eighteenth. In a heroic encounter at Atlanta against vastly superior numbers the regiment was outflanked and a majority of its members captured. The regiment was consolidated with the Third under Col. Butler. It fought at Jonesboro and moved north, reaching Franklin too late for the battle; was detached to aid Forrest, and engaged the enemy near Murfreesboro and elsewhere; and after Hood's defeat at Nashville moved to the Carolinas where it fought at Bentonville and surrendered at Greensboro.

The Nineteenth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Hamilton, Knox, Polk, Rhea, Hawkins, Washington and Sullivan Counties, and was organized in May, 1861, at Knoxville, with David M Cummings, colonel. It was first distributed over East Tennessee to do guard duty, and about July 1 was united and stationed at Cumberland Gap. It marched north on the Kentucky campaign; lost one man killed at Barboursville; was in reserve at "Wild Cat;" fought bravely at Fishing Creek, losing about fifteen killed and wounded. Afterward terrible privations and sufferings were endured. It moved to Murfreesboro in February, 1862; thence to northern Mississippi; thence to Shiloh, where April 6 and 7 it was furiously engaged in the awful assaults on the "Hornet's Nest," losing over 100 killed and wounded, and assisted in the capture of Prentiss' division. It was then reorganized and moved to Vicksburg, where, in the swamps, it suffered terribly from disease, and later fought at Baton Rouge. It then moved north and joined Bragg's army and participated in the sweeping Confederate victory at Murfreesboro losing over 125 killed and wounded. It moved south and in September, 1863, at Chickamauga, fought with magnificent bravery, losing over one-third of those engaged. Again at Missionary Ridge, in November, it was hotly and stubbornly engaged, sustaining severe loss. In 1864, from Dalton to Atlanta, in all the bloody battles of that memorable campaign, it fought with conspicuous daring and sorrowful losses. Among the slain was the beloved Col. Walker. It did its duty at Jonesboro and Lovejoy, and in the awful assault at Franklin shed its best blood without stint all over the stricken field. It fought at Nashville, retreated sorrowfully south, skirmishing at Sugar Creek and Pulaski. It fought its last battle at Bentonville, and surrendered at High Point, NC, with sixty-four men.

The Twentieth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Sumner, Perry and Smith Counties, and was organized at Camp Trousdale in June, 1861, with Joel A Battle, colonel. Late in July it was ordered to Virginia, but returned after reaching Bristol, and marched north with Zollicoffer on the Kentucky campaign, skirmishing at Barboursville, participating in the action at "Wild Cat," fighting furiously at Fishing Creek, losing 33 killed on the field and about 100 wounded. It then moved to northern Mississippi and in April participated with splendid valor in the brilliant Confederate success at Shiloh, losing 187 men killed and wounded. The regiment was then reorganized, moved to Vicksburg, participated in the movement there, fought at Baton Rouge, thence marched to Murfreesboro, in which memorable battle it was hotly and furiously engaged, sustaining a loss of 178 killed and wounded of 350 engaged. Later it fought desperately at Hoover's Gap, losing 45 killed and wounded. At bloody Chickamauga the Twentieth displayed wonderful dash and pluck, losing 98 killed and wounded of 140 engaged. At Missionary Ridge it fought brilliantly and retreated in good order. It wintered at Dalton and in 1864, in the famous Georgia campaign, fought with splendid courage at Resaca, Dalton, New Hope Church, Pine Mountain, Kenesaw, Peach Tree Creek, Jonesboro and the actions around Atlanta, losing heavily in the aggregate. Again at Franklin, in those awful assaults in the flaming teeth of death, it displayed heroic valor and suffered desperate loss. It bore its gallant but sorrowful part at Nashville and sadly retreated, marching to the Carolinas to almost literally "die in the last ditch." At Greensboro, NC, thirty-four sad men surrendered and returned to blighted homes to repair the ravages of war.

The Twenty-first Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Shelby and Hardeman Counties about the last of April, 1861, and was soon organized with Ed. Pickett, colonel. It reported first to Gen. Cheatham at Union City, and later moved up to Columbus, Ky. It participated in the sharp action at Belmont, November 7, then moved back to Columbus and to Union City where it remained a short period; then moved southward and finally participated in the furious battle of Shiloh, and later was consolidated with the Second Regiment to form the Fifth Confederate Regiment.

The Twenty-second Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in the counties of Gibson, Carroll, Dyer, Hardeman and in Kentucky and Louisiana, and was organized at Trenton about July 1, 1861, with Thomas J Freeman, colonel. It operated in West Tennessee and in the movement which culminated in the battle of Belmont, November 7, where it fought and lost about seventy-five killed and wounded. It returned south with the army and located near Corinth. It fought at Shiloh, losing nearly one-half of those engaged, and displayed great gallantry on the field, Col. Freeman being wounded. It then moved back to Corinth, where it was re-organized and consolidated with the Twelfth Regiment and thenceforward lost its identity. Col. Freeman served the one year of enlistment. The consolidation was commanded by Col. Bell, who became a brigadier under Forrest. Col. Freeman, at Shiloh; received the surrender of Gen. Prentiss, who handed him his sword.

The Twenty-third Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Bedford, Marshall, Rutherford and other counties of Middle Tennessee, and was organized about the middle of July, 1861, with R H Keeble, colonel. It saw its first service in Virginia, and participated in the engagement at Drury's Bluff, with a loss of fifteen or twenty killed and wounded. After various movements it was engaged in the brilliant and furious battle of Shiloh, where it lost severely. It moved north with Bragg and fought at Perryville, then turned south and participated at Murfreesboro, after which it continued with the Army of the Tennessee during the remainder of the war. At Chickamauga it lost heavily. It was at Missionary Ridge and in the famous Georgia campaign, after which it marched back with Hood into Tennessee, and participated at Franklin and Nashville, then moved to North Carolina where it surrendered. At Murfreesboro it was in Johnson's brigade of Cleburne's division.

The Twenty-fourth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was organized in June, 1861, at Camp Anderson, near Murfreesboro, and comprised twelve companies raised in the counties of Williamson, Rutherford, Maury, Bedford, Coffee, Smith, DeKalb, Sumner, Hickman and Perry. It was first commanded by Col. R D Allison, and later by Col. Bratton and Col. John Wilson. It moved into Kentucky and was stationed at Cave City in October. At this time it was in Col. Shaver's brigade of Hardee's division. It was in Gen. Strahl's brigade during the most of the war. It participated in the pitched battle of Shiloh, losing many, and was reorganized at or near Corinth; thence moved via Chattanooga on the Kentucky campaign, and was severely engaged at Perryville. It then retreated with Bragg's army, and on December 31, 1862, participated in the splendid charge at Murfreesboro, losing again heavily. It moved south, and in September, 1863, was hotly engaged at bloody Chickamauga, and later participated at Missionary Ridge. In 1864 it was in all the leading engagements in the famous Georgia campaign, and in the aggregate lost heavily. It moved with Hood's army to Jonesboro; thence to Tennessee, where it participated at Franklin and Nashville; thence moved to North Carolina, and in the spring of 1865 surrendered at Greensboro.

The Twenty-fifth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Overton, White, Putnam and Jackson Counties, and was organized at Camp Zollicoffer, near Livingston, early in June, 1861, with S S Stanton, colonel. After several months of discipline it invaded Kentucky to break up organizations of Federal home guards, and in January, 1862, joined Gen. Zollicoffer at Mill Springs, Ky., and was engaged in the battle of Fishing Creek, suffering considerable loss and displaying great dash and pluck. It then moved to Murfreesboro, thence to northern Mississippi, where it did important provost duty, and after Shiloh was reorganized, with Stanton, colonel, who was soon succeeded by John M Hughes. It marched to Chattanooga, thence north on Bragg's Kentucky campaign; fought bravely at Perryville, with loss; thence marched to Murfreesboro, in which headlong battle it displayed magnificent fighting qualities and lost heavily in killed and wounded. It participated at Fairfield, Beach Grove and Hoover's Gap, losing heavily at the latter battle. At the fierce battle of Chickamauga it distinguished itself, capturing valuable ordnance and sweeping desperately everything from its course. It then moved with Longstreet against Knoxville, fighting at Fort Loudon, Bean's Station (twice), Clinch Valley and Fort Sanders, suffering severe loss. It passed a winter of intense suffering among the mountains of East Tennessee, and in February, 1864, moved to near Richmond, Va. It fought desperately at Drury Bluff and in numerous engagements around Petersburg and Richmond, displaying its habitual brilliancy, and was finally surrendered at Appomattox.

The Twenty-sixth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Washington, Sullivan, Meigs, Cocke, Grainger, Rhea, Hamilton, Knox and Roane Counties, and was organized at Camp Lillard, Knoxville, September 6, 1861, with John M Lillard, colonel. Late in September it moved to Bowling Green; thence later to Russellville, Ky., and early in February to the relief of Fort Donelson. Here it did its first gallant fighting, amid severe loss and heroic personal achievements. It was captured, taken to Northern prisons, and exchanged at Vicksburg in September, 1862. It was reorganized at Knoxville, with Lillard, colonel, moved west, and in December, at brilliant Murfreesboro, fought in the furious charges of that famous battle. It moved south, and at Chickamauga fought with fiery energy, losing heavily, Col. Lillard falling mortally wounded. R M Saffell succeeded him in command. It also did meritorious and bloody work at Missionary Ridge, passed the winter of 1863-64 in northern Georgia, and fought brilliantly in all the leading engagements down to Atlanta, suffering severe loss. At Jonesboro and Lovejoy, and in the Tennessee campaign at bloody Franklin and stubborn Nashville, it displayed its accustomed dash and valor. It retreated south, and at Bentonville, NC, lost Col. Saffell, whose successor on the field, Col. A F Boggess, fell in the same fight. The regiment surrendered in April, 1865.

The Twenty-seventh Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Benton, Obion, McNairy, Haywood, Weakley, Carroll, Decatur and Henderson Counties, and was organized at Trenton, late in July, 1861, with C H Williams, colonel. It occupied Camp of Instruction until after the battle of Belmont; then moved to Columbus, Ky., and later to Bowling Green. Early in February, 1862, it moved to Nashville; then to Murfreesboro, then to northern Mississippi. In April it fought desperately at Shiloh, losing over 100 killed and wounded. It was transferred to Chattanooga, and then moved north on the Kentucky campaign. October 8, at Perryville, it left the bloody field proud of its splendid conduct. At Murfreesboro, in December, it assisted in the furious charges which swept the right wing of the Federals back several miles. At Chickamauga it fought with superb courage, forcing the enemy back at every point, and at Missionary Ridge held its ground long against overwhelming numbers. In the Georgia campaign of 1864 it fought with its usual brilliancy in all the leading engagements on the retrograde movement to Atlanta. Again at Jonesboro and Lovejoy it participated and marched north on the ill-fated Tennessee campaign. In the furious and brilliant charges at Franklin the gallant regiment steadily carried its streaming banner across the bloody field, losing nearly half of those engaged. In the stubborn contest for its capital city it bore a heroic part, but was overwhelmed and swept back, and then sadly marched down to the Carolinas, where at Bentonville it fought its last battle. It surrendered in April, 1865.

The Twenty-eighth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Wilson, Putnam, Jackson, White and Smith Counties, and was organized at Camp Zollicoffer, Overton County, in August, 1861, with John P Murray, colonel. After destroying Federal supplies the regiment joined Gen. Zollicoffer and fought at Fishing Creek with the loss of 10 men. It then moved south to northern Mississippi, and in April, 1862, participated in the brilliant movements at Shiloh, with the loss of over 100 of its best men. It then moved south and finally fought at Baton Rouge and Port Hudson, displaying brilliant and meritorious courage. It then joined Bragg's campaign to Kentucky, and fought at Perryville; then moved south and engaged the enemy in the brilliant charge at Murfreesboro. It was reorganized with S S Stanton, colonel, and consolidated with the Eighty-fourth. At Chickamauga it fought its hardest and grandest battle, losing 230 killed and wounded, and covering itself with imperishable glory. It skirmished around Chattanooga and did guard duty in East Tennessee. In the Georgia campaign it was engaged in all the principal contests, losing heavily, and in Hood's Tennessee campaign distinguished itself for courage and hardihood, displaying rare daring and valor on Franklin's bloody field. After the battle of Nashville it moved south, and after Bentonville was surrendered in North Carolina.

The Twenty-ninth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was composed of companies from Greene, Bradley, Hawkins, Polk, Claiborne, Hancock and Washington Counties, and was organized at Henderson's Mills, Greene County, in July, 1861, with Samuel Powell, colonel. It did guard duty in East Tennessee until December, and then joined Zollicoffer at Mill Springs, and January 19 met the enemy at the battle of Fishing Creek, where Col. Powell was permanently disabled. It marched to northern Mississippi via Murfreesboro, and remained at Iuka during the battle of Shiloh. It skirmished around Corinth, moved to Chattanooga; thence north on the Kentucky campaign, being commanded by Horace Rice, who had succeeded Arnold, met the enemy at Perryville; thence marched to Murfreesboro, where it exhibited splendid intrepidity and courage, losing 36 killed on the field and 136 wounded. At Chickamauga it was held much in reserve, but lost, killed and wounded 32. At Missionary Ridge it did gallant work and was complimented on the field by Gens. Cheatham and Hardee. In 1864 at Dalton, Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek and around Atlanta it was prominently engaged. It participated at Jonesboro and Lovejoy; and in Hood's Tennessee campaign at Franklin its gallant action was surpassed by no other regiment, its dead and wounded lying scattered over its bloody path. It fought at Nashville, retreated south with the army, and fought late in the day at Bentonville. It surrendered at Greensboro April 26.

The Thirtieth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Davidson, Sumner, Robertson and Smith Counties, and was organized early in October with J W Head, colonel. In November it moved to Fort Donelson, and February 13 to 16 was prominently engaged and was surrendered on the 16th and taken to Northern prisons. They were exchanged the following July, were reorganized at Camp Jackson with J J Turner as colonel, moved to Holly Springs, thence to Grenada, thence to Vicksburg, fought bravely at Chickasaw Bayou, doing the enemy great damage. It then moved to Port Hudson, thence to Jackson. At Raymond May 12, 1863, the regiment fought with great skill and desperation against superior numbers, losing about seventy-five killed and wounded, and then retreated to Jackson. After various movements it participated, September 19 and 20, at the fearful contest at Chickamauga, displaying wonderful dash and staying qualities, and losing killed and wounded about half of those engaged. At Missionary Ridge it was hotly and gallantly engaged, losing severely. Winter was passed at Dalton. In 1864, from Dalton to Jonesboro, in all the bloody principal engagements, the Thirtieth sustained its high honor and courage and in the aggregate lost many splendid men. At Jonesboro the regiment in heroic action lost one-third of its troops. In the unfortunate campaign of Gen. Hood into Tennessee the regiment participated at Murfreesboro, Franklin and Nashville further distinguishing itself in the bloody art of war. It marched down to the Carolinas to fight its last battle at Bentonville and surrendered April 26.

The Thirty-first Tennessee (Confederate, West Tennessee) Regiment was raised in Weakley, Haywood, Madison, McNairy and Decatur Counties, and was organized during the summer of 1861 with A H Bradford, colonel, and November 29 marched for Columbus, Ky., where it remained until the surrender of Fort Donelson in February, 1862; thence moved to Tiptonville, thence to Fort Pillow, and, after the battle of Shiloh, to Corinth. Later it was moved to Chattanooga, and then moved north campaigning through Kentucky with Bragg. At Perryville the regiment had its first heavy engagement, displaying great gallantry and losing many valuable soldiers. Egbert E Tansil succeeded Bradford as colonel. It marched south with the army and December 31 fought with conspicuous courage at Murfreesboro, and retreated south with the army, and in September, 1863, fought in the awful battle of Chickamauga, losing nearly half its men. In 1864, in the Georgia campaign, it was engaged in nearly all the principal battles, losing heavily in the aggregate. In the Tennessee campaign of Hood it fought at Franklin, losing over half the number engaged. Col. Stafford was killed on the enemy's line, to which he had penetrated. Again it fought at Nashville, thence moved to North Carolina, where it surrendered.

The Thirty-first Tennessee (Confederate, East Tennessee) Regiment was raised in Jefferson, Blount and Knox Counties, and was organized March 28, 1862, with W M Bradford, colonel, and was reorganized May 3. It did guard duty in East Tennessee and at Cumberland Gap, joined Bragg at Harrodsburg after the battle of Perryville, and late in December moved to Vicksburg, in the vicinity of which it participated in numerous expeditions and skirmishes, and in the siege of that city where the soldiers were almost starved to death and finally captured. In September, 1863, the regiment was exchanged and late in that year was transformed into cavalry, and as such brigaded under Gen. Vaughn. It did service in East Tennessee, recruited in North Carolina, part was sent to Virginia and while there fought at Kernstown, Martinsburgh, Hagerstown, Winchester, Piedmont and elsewhere, losing heavily. Later the united regiment was engaged at Marion, Saltville, Morristown, Bull's Gap, Greeneville and elsewhere. Marching to join Lee in the spring of 1865, it was learned that he had surrendered and Gen. Echols disbanded his command, but this regiment with others refused, and marched to North Carolina and joined President Davis, and was his escort when all were captured. The regiment was paroled at Washington, Ga.

The Thirty-second Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Giles, Lawrence, Williamson, Lincoln, Marshall and Franklin Counties, and was organized at Camp Trousdale during the summer of 1861 with Edmund E Cook, colonel. About September it was moved to East Tennessee, where it did patrol duty around Chattanooga and Bridgeport, Ala. Late in December it moved to Bowling Green, Ky., thence in February, 1862, to Russellville; thence to Clarksville, and thence to Fort Donelson, where from the 13th to the 16th of February it participated in all the daring movements of the siege with severe loss, and was captured with the fort. After about six months the regiment was exchanged at Vicksburg. It was reorganized about October 1, with E Cook, colonel, and moved to Murfreesboro via Knoxville, and during the battle was posted at Wartrace. It wintered at Tullahoma, endured a terrible forced march in June, moved to Chattanooga with Bragg in July, and fought with superb courage and coolness in the awful conflict at Chickamauga with heavy loss. Again it was engaged at Lookout Mountain, and in November at Missionary Ridge, where it fought with its accustomed gallantry. It wintered at Dalton, and in 1864 participated in the famous Georgia campaign, fighting in all the leading battles down to Atlanta with heavy loss in the aggregate. It fought desperately and with grievous loss at Jonesboro, and marched north to invade Tennessee under Hood, but reached bloody Franklin too late for the battle. It participated in the action at Nashville, retreated south skirmishing on the way, fought its last battle at Bentonville, NC and surrendered with Gen. Johnston.

The Thirty-third Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Weakley, Obion, Madison and other counties, and was organized at Union City October 18, 1861, with A W Campbell, colonel. In January, 1862 it marched to Columbus, Ky., where it wintered; then moved south into northern Mississippi, and in April met the enemy on the furious field of Shiloh, and attested its courage in its desperate charges and its loss of nearly 200 men killed and wounded out of about 500 engaged. The regiment moved back to Corinth, and later, via Chattanooga, invaded Kentucky under Gen. Bragg, and at Perryville, in October, fought with magnificent bravery, suffering heavy losses. After this it moved south with Bragg, and at Murfreesboro bore an honorable part, losing many noble men. At Chickamauga it assisted in the awful charges which beat back the Federal hosts. It fought at Missionary Ridge and retreated south, wintering at Dalton, and in 1864 participated in the series of bloody and memorable battles from that point to Atlanta, shedding the blood of its bravest boys in defense of the cause which to them seemed right. It marched north with Hood; was at Franklin and Nashville; thence marched south, and finally surrendered in North Carolina in April, 1865.

The Thirty-fourth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised partly in Middle Tennessee and partly in East Tennessee, and was organized during the autumn of 1861, with William Churchwell, colonel. It first saw service in East Tennessee, where it remained for a considerable period engaged in outpost duty. It finally participated in the Kentucky campaign, and later joined the army of Bragg in time for the battle of Murfreesboro, in which desperate engagement it was conspicuously active, losing severely in killed and wounded. It moved south with the retreating army, and after various movements was engaged in the bloody battle of Chickamauga, in September, 1863, where it behaved gallantly and lost severely. In 1864 it participated in the actions of the Georgia campaign, terminating at Atlanta, and then moved back into Tennessee with Hood, taking part in his bloody battles. It then moved south with the army, and finally surrendered in North Carolina.

The Thirty-fifth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Grundy, Sequatchie, Warren, Cannon, Bledsoe and Van Buren, and was organized in the autumn of 1861, with B J Hill, colonel. About the first of the year 1863 it moved to Bowling Green, Ky., and after the surrender of Fort Donelson marched south with the army to northern Mississippi, and early in April participated in the battle of Shiloh, with heavy loss. Its charges were brilliant, sweeping and destructive. It then skirmished around Corinth, fighting with heroic desperation at Shelton Hill amid a terrible fire. It was complimented for this in general orders by Gen. Beauregard. It moved with Bragg on the Kentucky campaign, meeting the enemy again at Richmond and Perryville, displaying its usual heroism. At Murfreesboro it was hotly engaged, suffering severely, and again, in September, 1863, at brilliant Chickamauga sustained itself with distinguished valor. It did important provost or guard duty throughout northern Alabama, and finally surrendered at Chattanooga in the spring of 1865.

The Thirty-sixth, Thirty-ninth and Fortieth Tennessee Regiments were only partly organized, and in the main saw detached duty. The first was commanded by Col. Morgan, the second by Col. Avery. The last was at Fort Pillow in January, 1862. Col. Avery was at Bowling Green in December, 1861, and Col. Morgan at Cumberland Gap in March, 1862.

The Thirty-seventh Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Hamilton, Jefferson, Grainger, Blount, Sevier, Claiborne, Coffee and Washington Counties, in northern Georgia and in Alabama, and was organized in October, 1861, at Camp Ramsey, near Knoxville, with W H Carroll, colonel. At Germantown, West Tennessee, to which point it was transferred, it drilled for about a month. In November it moved to Chattanooga. It marched north and was present at the battle of Fishing Creek, but did not participate in the main battle, losing only five or six killed and wounded. It then moved south via Murfreesboro to northern Mississippi, and occupied Burnsville during the battle of Shiloh. The regiment did valuable picket service around Corinth. In July it moved to Mobile, Montgomery, Atlanta, Dalton, Chickamauga Station, Chattanooga, and thence on the Kentucky campaign, and October 8, at Perryville, was hotly engaged. It then marched south, and in October reached Murfeesboro, where, December 31, it was engaged in that battle in the hottest part, losing about half its members killed and wounded. It then moved to Chattanooga. The following June it was consolidated with the Fifteenth under the latter name, and so lost its old existence.

The Thirty-eighth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Madison, Fayette, Shelby and other West Tennessee counties, in Wilson County, and in Georgia and Alabama, and was organized in September, 1861, with Robert F Looney, of Memphis, colonel. It moved first to Chattanooga, thence later to Knoxville, where it was stationed at the date of the battle of Fishing Creek, Kentucky, having no arms with which to assist Gen. Zollicoffer. It was finally ordered to Iuka, Miss., thence to Eastport, thence to Corinth, and was brigaded first with Gen. Gladden, and later with Gen. Preston Pond, with Louisiana troops. It moved up and fought at Shiloh, losing ninety killed and wounded. It moved with Bragg to Perryville, where it fought, and was soon after reorganized, with John C Carter, colonel. It moved back and fought at Murfreesboro; thence marched down to Chickamauga, where it distinguished itself. It was at Missionary Ridge, and in 1864 engaged in the Georgia campaign with heavy loss. It came north with Hood, fought at Franklin, where Gen. Carter was killed, and at Nashville, then marched south, and in 1865 surrendered in North Carolina.

The Forty-first Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Franklin, Lincoln, Bedford and Marshall Counties, and was organized at Camp Trousdale in November, 1861, with Robert Farquharson, colonel. In December it moved to Bowling Green; thence to Fort Donelson, where it fought gallantly and was captured by the enemy. In September, 1862, it was exchanged at Vicksburg, and was reorganized with Farquharson colonel. After various expeditions the regiment was transferred, in January, 1863, to Port Hudson. In May it moved north, where, at Raymond, it met the enemy in a sharp battle, and afterward in that vicinity and around Jackson participated in several severe fights and numerous skirmishes. It was at Yazoo City when Vicksburg surrendered. Early in September it marched east to Chickamauga, and was in the hottest part of that gigantic and desperate battle. Many of its bravest were stretched dead upon the field. It wintered in Dalton, and in 1864, in the Georgia campaign, was engaged in all the principal engagements down to Atlanta, fighting gallantly and losing heavily. At Jonesboro it also fought, and on the Tennessee campaign at Franklin was not surpassed in desperate fighting by any other regiment. It finally surrendered in North Carolina. During the war it lost more men on picket duty than in battle.

The Forty-second Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised under the first call in Cheatham, Montgomery and other counties, and five companies in Alabama, and was organized about the 1st of October, 1861, with W A Quarles, colonel. It occupied Camps Cheatham and Sevier, and in February reached Fort Donelson just in time for the battle, in which it distinguished itself and lost severely. It was captured, and in September, 1862, was exchanged at Vicksburg, and soon reorganized at Clinton, Miss. Quarles was re-elected colonel. Here five companies from West Tennessee took the place of the five Alabama companies. In March, 1863, I. N. Hulme became colonel, vice Quarles promoted. It participated in various movements in Mississippi before the surrender of Vicksburg and during the seige. It then moved on sundry expeditions, and in 1864 joined the campaign through Georgia, and was engaged at New Hope Church, Pine Mountain, Kenesaw, Smyrna Depot, Peach Tree Creek, Atlanta and Lick Skillet road, losing in the aggregate heavily. In Hood's bloody campaign the regiment at Franklin, in those awful assaults, left about half its numbers killed and wounded upon the field. This was its most desperate battle, and here it exhibited superb courage. It participated in the stubborn contest at Nashville, and moved south with the army, and finally surrendered in North Carolina in April, 1865.

The Forty-third Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in the counties of Hamilton, Rhea, Meigs, Polk, Bledsoe, Jefferson, Roane, Bradley, Hawkins and McMinn, and was organized in November, 1861, with J W Gillespie, colonel. Its first service was guard duty in East Tennessee until the reorganization in May, 1862. After various movements and thorough drill at Charleston, it was, in August, sent to Humphrey Marshall's brigade in Virginia. It soon afterward joined Bragg's Kentucky campaign, but was in no noteworthy engagement. In December it was transferred to Vicksburg and was subjected to hard service, and in May, 1863, moved to Port Gibson to oppose Grant's advance. It fought at Champion Hill and covered the retreat to Vicksburg. It fought often during the siege, always with dash and daring, losing heavily in the aggregate. It surrendered early in July, and was soon exchanged and was ordered to re-enforce Longstreet, who was beseiging Knoxville. During the winter the regiment was mounted, and in the spring of 1864 did outpost duty in East Tennessee, skirmishing often and losing severely. It was engaged at Piedmont, losing several men. In Virginia it was often engaged, moving with Early around Washington and fighting at Winchester, Monocacy, Cedar Creek, Fisherville, White Post, Kernstown, Darksville and Martinsburg. In the fall of 1864 it returned to East Tennessee. It fought at Morristown, losing heavily; raided Russelville with success; during the winter it did outpost duty. In the spring it learned of Lee's surrender and then moved south with Johnson, but at Charlotte met President Davis and served as his escort until his capture. It was paroled in May, 1865.

The Forty-fourth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Bedford, Grundy, Lincoln, Franklin and Coffee Counties, and was organized at Camp Trousdale in December, 1861, with C A McDaniel, colonel. It soon moved to Bowling Green, and early in February, 1862, to Nashville, thence to Murfreesboro, thence to Corinth, where it arrived March 20. In April it marched north and fought gallantly at bloody Shiloh, losing 350 killed, wounded, captured and missing out of 470 engaged. It reorganized at Corinth and with it was consolidated the remnant of the Fifty-fifth Regiment. Late in July it moved to Chattanooga, thence north to invade Kentucky, and October 8 fought desperately at Perryville, losing 42 killed and wounded. It suffered in that awful retreat south. September 19 and 20, 1863, at Chattanooga the regiment fought heroically and charged the enemy with terrible effect, losing severely. It was soon detached and sent with Longstreet to besiege Knoxville. It fought at Bean's Station and elsewhere and went into winter quarters at Morristown. In May, 1864, it moved to Richmond, Va., and was engaged at Drury's Bluff, Petersburg, Walthall's Junction and elsewhere besides numerous skirmishes, and was finally surrendered and paroled.

The Forty-fifth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in the counties of Wilson (Companies B, F, G and H), Williamson (A), and Rutherford (D, C, E and I), and was organized at Camp Trousdale, Sumner County in the autumn of 1861, with Addison Mitchell, colonel. After various movements, during which it did duty in Mississippi and Louisiana, it joined the army of Gen. A S Johnston and participated in the brilliant Confederate victory at Shiloh, losing heavily in killed and wounded. Company A suffered a loss of 7 killed and about twice as many wounded. It was reorganized at Corinth and was then placed on detached duty for some time, after which it participated in the Kentucky campaign, and later was engaged in the headlong charges at Murfreesboro, where it again lost severely. It moved southward; fought in the hottest of the awful battle of Chickamauga and again at Missionary Ridge, and in 1864, in many of the general engagements, on the movement to Atlanta, Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca (two) Powder Springs, Atlanta and Jonesboro and then at Columbia; second Murfreesboro, and in 1865, at Bentonville, NC, where it surrendered.

The Forty-sixth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in West Tennessee, almost all the entire force going from Henry County, and was organized late in 1861, with J M Clarke, colonel. It participated in the movement of Gen. Pillow up the Mississippi, was at Columbus and Island No. 10, and later at Port Hudson, where it lost several men, killed and wounded. For a time it was part of Stewart's brigade. Many of the regiment were captured and died in prison at Camp Douglas and elsewhere. It participated in the Kentucky campaign under Gen. Bragg, losing a few men killed and wounded at Perryville. It participated with the Army of Tennessee in all the principal movements of that command, engaging the enemy in numerous places and losing in the aggregate heavily. It was finally consolidated with other regiments.

The Forty-seventh Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was organized late in 1861, with M R Hill, colonel, and was raised in the counties of Obion, Gibson and Dyer, and first participated in the movements of Gen. Polk's army succeeding the battle of Belmont. It moved southward and joined the army, and finally, in April, 1862, engaged the enemy at Shiloh. Later it participated in the actions around Corinth, and finally marched with Bragg into Kentucky, fighting at Richmond and skirmishing elsewhere. It returned to Tennessee, and just before the battle of Murfreesboro was consolidated with the Twelfth Regiment.

The Forty-eighth Tennessee (Confederate, Voorhees) Regiment was raised in Maury, Hickman and Lewis Counties, and was organized in December, 1861, with W M Voorhees, colonel. It moved to Clarksville, thence to Danville, thence to Fort Henry, and after the evacuation there, to Fort Donelson, where, after fighting in that historical action, it surrendered. After about six months it was exchanged at Vicksburg, was reorganized at Jackson with Voorhees again colonel. A portion of the regiment, on details, in hospitals and on furlough, had escaped the capture at Fort Donelson, and with five companies from Wayne and Lawrence Counties, had served under Col. Nixon until December, 1862, when the old regiment was reunited, the portion that had been captured having been incorporated with the Third from the exchange in August until the reunion. It was at the bombardment of Port Hudson, in March, 1863, and at the engagements in and around Jackson about the middle of July. After various movements it reached Dalton, Ga., November 26. January, 1864, it moved to Mobile, thence joined Polk's army, thence to Meridian, thence to Mobile, thence joined Joe Johnston at New Hope Church, May 27, 1864. It fought at New Hope Church, Pine Mountain, Kenesaw, Peach Tree Creek, Atlanta, Lick Skillet Road, losing in the aggregate very heavily, particularly at the last named engagement, where it lost half its men. It was in all of Hood's engagements on his Tennessee campaign except Franklin. It was active and valiant at Nashville. In several small skirmishes detachments of the regiment fought with severe loss and great bravery. It was at Bentonville, NC, and surrendered in the spring of 1865.

The Forty-eighth Tennessee (Confederate, Nixon) Regiment was raised in Middle Tennessee, and organized late in 1861, with G H Nixon, colonel. After various duties it participated in the campaign against Louisville, and was engaged at Richmond, where it lost several men killed and wounded. It continued with the army until it was found that the forces at Louisville had been heavily reinforced, then turned back, and October 8 fought at Perryville, losing several men. It was in various movements subsidiary to those of the Army of Tennessee, was at Murfreesboro, and in September, 1863, at Chickamauga, where it lost severely, and exhibited great gallantry on the field. After this it participated in all the principal movements of the Army of Tennessee --- in many of the battles on the Georgia campaign, and finally took part in the actions around Atlanta and the invasion of Tennessee by Hood. After many vicissitudes, it finally surrendered in the spring of 1865 in North Carolina.

The Forty-ninth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Montgomery, Dickson, Robertson, Benton and Cheatham Counties, and was organized in December, 1861, with James E Bailey, colonel. It moved to Fort Donelson where it was hotly engaged in the various desperate movements of that action, and was surrendered with the army. It was exchanged in September, 1862, at Vicksburg, was reorganized at Clinton with Bailey, colonel. It was at Port Hudson during the bombardment of March, 1863; thence moved to Jackson, where, in July, it fought in the several engagements there; thence moved to Mobile, where W F Young became colonel. It then moved north and joined Bragg at Missionary Ridge, too late for the battle; thence marched to Dalton; thence back to Mobile and Mississippi, and back to Johnston's army, at New Hope Church, where it fought May 27, 1864. It was afterward engaged at Pine Mountain, Kenesaw Mountain, Smyrna Depot, Peach Tree Creek, Atlanta, Lick Skillet Road and elsewhere, losing at the last named battle 76 killed, 400 wounded and 19 missing. Here it was consolidated with the Forty-second Regiment. It moved north with Hood, engaging in all the battles and skirmishes of his disastrous campaign. At the awful charges of Franklin it fought with great nerve and desperation, losing 20 killed, 36 wounded and 36 missing out of 130 engaged. It was engaged at Nashville and then retreated south, fighting at Lynnville, Sugar Creek, Anthony's Hill and elsewhere, and joining Johnson's army in North Carolina, where, at Bentonville, it fought its last battle and was surrendered with the army.

The Fiftieth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Montgomery, Stewart, Cheatham and Humphreys Counties, and was organized on Christmas Day, 1861, at Fort Donelson, with G W Stacker, colonel. In January it moved over to assist Fort Henry, and February 6 returned to Fort Donelson and assisted in the contest there which resulted in the surrender. Nearly half of the regiment escaped capture. In September, 1862, the regiment was exchanged and was reorganized at Jackson, Miss.; C A Sugg became colonel. It then operated in Mississippi, skirmishing several times. In November it was consolidated with the First Tennessee Battalion. It was at the bombardment of Port Hudson. In May, 1863, it moved to Jackson, and May 12 took an active part in the battle of Raymond. It also fought at Jackson. In September it joined Bragg in Georgia. On the way, in a railroad accident, 13 men were killed, and 75 wounded. The regiment reached Chickamauga in time to take an active part. It was in the bloodiest part of that awful contest, losing 132 of 186 engaged. Col. T W Beaumout was killed, and Maj. C W Robertson took command, but was mortally wounded. November 25, at Mission Ridge, the regiment was again cut to pieces, Col. Sugg of the brigade being mortally wounded. The regiment was then consolidated with the Fourth Confederate Regiment (Tennessee). It wintered at Dalton, and in the spring and summer of 1864 fought at Resaca, Calhoun Station, Adairsville, Kingston, New Hope Church, "Dead Angle," Peach Tree Creek, Atlanta, Jonesboro and elsewhere, losing many valuable men. It moved north, fought at Franklin and Nashville, then marched to North Carolina, where, in April, 1865, it surrendered.

The Fifty-first Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was organized at Henderson early in 1862, with eight companies, four from Shelby and Tipton Counties, and four from Madison and Henderson Counties. It was first commanded by Col. Browder. It participated in the siege of Forts Henry and Donelson, at which time it was only a battalion, and at the latter battle was assigned to artillery service, and consisted of only about sixty effective men. Col. Browder and part of the battalion were captured, but the lieutenant-colonel, John Chester, gathered the remainder together and with two other companies from Madison and Tipton, reorganized and moved to Corinth doing provost duty during the battle of Shiloh. It was then consolidated with the Fifty-second, with John Chester, colonel. On the Kentucky campaign it fought at Perryville, doing splendid execution, and losing 8 killed and about 30 wounded. At Murfreesboro it captured a battery and about 600 prisoners. At Shelbyville many of the men captured at Donelson rejoined the regiment. It was engaged at bloody Chickamauga with great gallantry, and again at Missionary Ridge. In many of the battles from Dalton to Atlanta it participated, and later at Franklin and Nashville lost very heavily. A small remnant was surrendered at Greensboro, NC.

The Fifty-second Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in West Tennessee late in 1861, and was organized with B J Lea as colonel. In January, 1862, it was stationed to guard the Tennessee railroad bridge, by order of Gen. Polk. It participated in the battles at Fort Donelson, and was then stationed at Henderson's Station, in West Tennessee, where it remained until ordered to Corinth in March, 1862. It moved with the army to Shiloh, and of its action in that battle Gen. Chalmers, its brigade commander, reported as follows: "A few skirmishers of the enemy advanced secretly and fired upon the Fifty-second, which broke and fled in the most shameful confusion, and all efforts to rally it were without avail, and it was ordered out of the lines, where it remained during the balance of the engagement, except companies commanded by Russell and Wilson, which gallantly fought in the Fifth Mississippi Regiment." In many a bloody battle afterward it redeemed itself nobly. It was consolidated with the Fifty-first, and was at Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga and in all the general engagements of the Georgia campaign; came back with Hood and fought at Franklin, Nashville and elsewhere, and marched down to North Carolina, where it surrendered April, 1865.

The Fifty-third Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was organized late in the year 1861, into a battalion under the command of Col. Ed Abernathy. It was present at the battles and assaults of Fort Donelson and fought on the left wing, showing great gallantry, repulsing two headlong charges. It had at this time about 200 effective men. It was captured and seems then to have lost its identity. It was probably consolidated with other commands.

The Fifty-fourth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was organized at Nashville during the autumn of 1861, and comprised companies from the counties of Lawrence, Wayne and probably others. Upon the organization William Dearing was chosen colonel. The regiment moved first into Kentucky to assist in repelling the Federal advance, but early in February, 1862, was ordered to Fort Donelson, in the siege of which it was actively engaged. It succeeded in making its escape, but became almost disbanded. The portion that remained was formed into a battalion at Corinth, and placed under the command of Col. Nixon. Later the battalion was consolidated with the Forty-eighth Regiment.

The Fifty-fifth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in the counties of Davidson, Williamson, Smith, Bedford and Lincoln, and was organized in November, 1861, under Col. A J Brown. It participated at Fort Donelson and was reorganized at Corinth. It was engaged at Shiloh, where it lost very heavily in killed and wounded. Col. McCoen was succeeded by Col. Reed, who was mortally wounded in December, 1862. After Shiloh it was consolidated with the Forty-fourth Regiment.

The Fifty-ninth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in East Tennessee during the winter of 1861-62, and was mustered into the service with J B Cooke, colonel. It did duty in various commands in Tennessee and Kentucky, and finally, about January 1, 1863, became connected with the Confederate force at Vicksburg, and was brigaded with the Third Confederate, the Thirty-first and the Forty-third under Gen. A W Reynolds in Stevenson's division. After this its record is the same as that of the Third Regiment. The regiment was commanded much of its term of service by Col. W L Eakin.

The Sixtieth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was organized in East Tennessee in the autumn of 1862, with John H Crawford, colonel. Soon after its organization it was assigned to the brigade of John C Vaughn and ordered to Mississippi and Louisiana, and thereafter, during the remainder of the war, its record is similar to that of Vaughn's brigade. It was engaged at Jackson, and against Sherman's movement on Vicksburg. During the siege of that city it garrisoned the Confederate works. It also assisted gallantly in opposing the advance of Gen. Grant from below Vicksburg. At Big Black Bridge it lost severely and fought against great odds. July 4, 1863, it was surrendered with Pemberton's army, after having reached the point of starvation. It was finally exchanged, and then joined Gen. Longstreet in his movement against Knoxville. It was mounted in December, 1863, and spent the winter of 1863-64 guarding the front and in recruiting, and in the spring advanced into Virginia and fought at Piedmont. It was at Lynchburg, Williamsport, and along the Potomac and the Shenandoah Rivers, and was engaged in western Virginia when the news of Gen. Lee's surrender was received. The gallant regiment resolved to join Johnston, and accordingly rendezvoused at Charlotte, but finally surrendered with Vaughn's brigade.

The Sixty-first Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Hawkins, Sullivan, Greene, Jefferson, Washington, Grainger and Claiborne Counties, and was organized at Henderson Mills, in Greene County, in November, 1862, with F E Pitts, colonel. It almost immediately became a part of Vaughn's brigade, with which it served during the remainder of the war. (See Sixtieth Regiment.)

The Sixty-second Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was organized late in 1862, with John A Rowan, colonel, and was soon assigned to Vaughn's brigade, with which it served during the rest of the war.

The Sixty-third Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was raised in Washington, Roane, Hancock, Claiborne, Loudon, Hawkins and Sullivan Counties, and was organized July 30, 1862, with R G Fain, colonel. It operated in East Tennessee and was under the active or immediate command of Lieut.-Col. W H Fulkerson. After various movements it joined Bragg in Middle Tennessee in June, 1863, but only to retreat with his army to Chattanooga. It was then ordered to Knoxville, thence to Strawberry Plains, but late in August it moved back in time to participate in the great battle of Chickamauga, which, though its first engagement, was fought with splendid daring and discipline. It lost 47 killed and 155 wounded, out of 404 engaged. It was then detached with Longstreet to operate against Knoxville. It fought at Fort Sanders, Bean's Station, where it lost 18 killed and wounded, and wintered in East Tennessee. It was moved to Virginia, fought at Drury Bluff, where it lost 150 men, at Walthall's Junction, at Petersburg, and elsewhere, losing many men. April 2, 1865, a portion was captured, and the remainder surrendered at Appomattox.

The Eighty-fourth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was organized at McMinnville during the early winter of 1862, with S S Stanton, colonel, and was raised in the counties of Smith, White, Jackson, Putnam, DeKalb, Overton and Lincoln. In three days after its organization and in twelve hours after reaching Murfreesboro, it participated in that furious engagement, where the right wing of Rosecranz was routed from the field. It moved back to Tullahoma, and was here consolidated with the Twenty-eighth Regiment. (See sketch of the twenty-eighth.)

The One Hundred and Fifty-fourth Tennessee (Confederate) Regiment was organized at Memphis in 1860, before the war broke out, and was reorganized soon after the fall of Sumter with Preston Smith, colonel. Seven companies were raised in Memphis, one in Henry County, one in McNairy County, and one in Hardeman County. It first marched to Randolph in May, 1861, and after various movements marched north and participated in the battle of Belmont, and afterward moved south into Kentucky, and after the surrender of Fort Donelson to northern Mississippi, and in April fought at bloody Shiloh with severe loss. It was then at Corinth until the evacuation, then marched north with Bragg on the Kentucky campaign, fighting at Richmond, Ky., with great loss, and at Perryville, October 8. It marched south with the army, reaching Murfreesboro where, December 31, it was hotly engaged, losing over a third of those engaged. It retreated to Chattanooga, thence to Chickamauga, where it fought in that great battle in September, and later at Missionary Ridge. It wintered at Dalton, and in 1864, in the Georgia campaign fought in all the principal battles down to Atlanta, losing in the aggregate many valuable men. It marched north with Hood and invaded Tennessee, fighting at Franklin, Nashville and elsewhere, and retreating south out of the State. It marched to the Carolinas, participated in the action at Bentonville, and surrendered in April, 1865.


    In addition to the above organizations there were about twenty cavalry regiments whose movements it has been almost impossible to trace. About eighteen battalions of cavalry were in the Confederate service from Tennessee. Many of the battalions, which had first served as such and perhaps independently, were consolidated to form regiments. Aside from this there were numerous independent cavalry companies or squads organized in almost every county of the State to assist the Confederate cause. The leading cavalry organizations of the State served mainly with the commands of Gens. Wheeler, Wharton and Forrest.

    The artillery organizations of the State were so often changed, and have left such obscure records, that no attempt will be made here to trace their movements. They were in nearly all the artillery duels of the Mississippi department. The following is an imperfect list of the Tennessee batteries: Colms' Battery, Capt. S H Colms; Appeal Battery, Capt. W N Hogg; Bankhead's Battery, Capt. S P Bankhead; Barry's Battery, Capt. R L Barry; Belmont Battery, Capt. J G Anglade; Brown's Battery, Capt. W R Marshall; Burrough's Battery, Capt. W H Burroughs; Carnes' Battery, Capt. W W Carnes; Scott's Battery, Capt. W L Scott; Miller's Battery, Capt. William Miller; Rice's Battery, Capt. T W Rice; Kain's Battery, Capt. W C Kain; Anglade's Battery, Capt. J G Anglade; Mebane's Battery, Capt. J W Mebane; Wright's Battery, Capt. E E Wright; Morton's Battery, Capt. J W Morton; Jackson's Battery, Capt. W H Jackson; Freeman's Battery, Capt. S L Freeman; Hoxton's Battery, Capt. Lewis Hoxton; McAdoo's Battery, Capt. J M McAdoo; Huwald's Battery, Capt. G A Huwald; Krone's Battery, Capt. F Krone; Taylor's Battery, Capt. J W Taylor; Dismukes' Battery, Capt. P T Dismukes; Griffith's Battery, Capt. R P Griffith; Maney's Battery, Capt. F Maney; Calvert's Battery, Capt. J H Calvert; Eldridge's Battery, Capt. J W Eldridge; McClung's Battery, Capt. H L McClung; Tobin's Battery, Capt. Thomas Tobin; Stankienry's Battery, Capt. P K Stankienry; Bibb's Battery, Capt. R W Bibb; Wilson's Battery, Capt. W O Williams; Fisher's Battery, Capt. J A Fisher; McDonald's Battery, Capt. C McDonald; Ramsey's Battery, Capt. D B Ramsey; Keys' Battery, Capt. T J Keys; Porter's Battery, Capt. T K Porter; Baxter's Battery, Capt. E Baxter; Humes' Battery, Capt. W Y Humes; Jackson's Battery, W H Jackson; Lynch's Battery, Capt. J P Lynch, and others.


Top of Page
James Co., TN Page
If you have resources for James County or would like to volunteer to help with look-ups, please e-mail me at Tim Stowell / Chattanooga, TN
You are our 8496th visitor since 12 Mar 2006 -- thanks for stopping by!

There were ? visitors to this page from 18 Mar 2005 until 12 Mar 2006, because the site coordinator goofed.
There were 4140 visitors to this page from 26 Jul 2000 until its move to this location.


Last updated: 3 Jul 2009