Scott County, Tennessee
Mail List

This page was updated 06 Sep 2008


There are two mail lists that cover Scott Co, TN.  

The TNSCOTT mail list is strictly for people with an interest in Scott Co, TN genealogy and history.  This moderated list is used for queries and discussion surround Scott Co, TN families, locations, records, and the like.

The TN-SCOTT-HISTORY mail list is geared towards the cultural history of Scott Co, TN.  Everything from religion to recipes is discussed here.

Remember these mail lists are for asking questions and exchanging information on issues pertinent to Scott Co, TN.  The mail list moderator will remove off-topic messages and may unsubscribe you for repeated offenses.


Subscribe

Create an email message and only put the word "subscribe" in the body of the message.  Do not include any additional text in in the body of the message.  You do not need to put anything in the subject line of the email message.

You should receive an email confirmation message within 24 hours.

You should receive an email confirmation message within 24 hours.

Note:  If you want to change your subscription mode, unsubscribe from either list first then resubscribe in the new mode you prefer


Post a message

If you'd like to post a message so everyone on the mailing list receives it, just create an email (or click below) and send it to: 

Your email will then be sent to everyone in both list and digest mode for the respective mail list.  You don't need to send the email explicitly to both list and digest subscribers.

Create the email message like any other email you'd create.  Include a meaningful subject line and then fill out the body of your email message.  Remember these mail lists are for asking questions and exchanging information on issues pertinent to Scott Co, TN.  The mail list moderator will remove off-topic messages and may unsubscribe you for repeated offenses


Unsubscribe

Create an email message and only put the word "unsubscribe" in the body of the message.  Do not include any additional text in the body of the message.  You do not need to put anything in the subject line of the email message.


Archives


Tips for Effective Mail Listing

Make sure the subject line is concise and reflects the information you are seeking. Many people are on several mailing lists and due to the amount of mail they receive, they only have time to scan subject lines. "Need genealogy help" is not as likely to get results as a specific subject heading. If the inquiry is about an individual or family, be sure to include the surname (in caps). Other helpful info that can be included might be a date or time frame, location, or other identifying information. A commonly accepted format might be something like:

PUBLIC, John Q. 1887-1934 IRL>NYC>OHIO

Be creative and make your query stand out to the people that have the information you need.

Get to the point. Most people don't want to take the time to read a long drawn out query. The first paragraph should contain the "Who, What, Where, and When" of your request. Details can be filled in after you have gotten the attention of your targeted audience.

Include only one request in your post. Too many requests may decrease your chances for a response. Other inquiries can be posted separately.

Include places you have already checked for the information. Otherwise you may be wasting other listmembers' time, as well as your own, as you will have half a dozen replies telling you to search the obvious places that you have already checked. Let people know  these are the avenues  you have tried, and you are looking for an alternate route.

Capitalize SURNAMES so that they are easy to pick out of the post and subject lines. (You shouldn't capitalize an entire message as it makes it more difficult to read and some people consider it the online equivalent of shouting.)

Be careful with abbreviations in your query. Remember many mailing lists have members from all parts of the world and others may not be familiar with the same abbreviations we use. So spell it out whenever possible. This will eliminate the possibility for misinterpretation.

Familiarize yourself with online resources so you don't post unnecessary requests. If you are looking for a geographic location, try some of the online maps that are available to locate an ancestor's town.

Check your email settings. Make sure you are only sending plain text to mailing lists. Others may not have the capability to read HTML coded messages and you want your message to be received and readable by as many listmembers as possible.

Do not send your query as an attachment. Many viruses are transmitted as attachments and as a result, most people wisely refrain from opening attachments on email from people they don't know.

Sign your post with your name and email address. Some Email readers don't show the return email address and a recipient with the information you are looking for can't respond to you if they don't have your email address.

Re-read your post carefully before you send it. Check for typos. Did you include all the necessary information? (Remember the 4 W's: Who, What, Where, When). Are all of your facts correct? Have you signed it properly?

Make sure your post is neat, and polite. Manners count online too.

Be careful of what information you post online, particularly when referring to living persons. Be sure to respect peoples privacy and keep yourself and your family safe from those who might use information found online for fraudulent purposes.

If you find information worth sharing, post it to the appropriate list and share the source of the information so others may benefit from your "finds." As you help others, they will be more eager to help you in return.

Always be polite on the lists and refrain from flaming. No one wants to help someone who is constantly complaining or mean to others.

Keep a log of your email messages so you know what requests you have already put out and when. For more information, read "Citing the Messages" by Drew Smith at: http://www.ancestry.com/library/view/gencomp/2707.asp (Genealogical Computing, Spring 1998, Vol. 17, No. 4)

By using common sense and following simple guidelines, you can benefit greatly from mailing lists. They are a great place to make friends, find relatives, and information.

Some other helpful mailing list related articles:

"Surnames Via the Internet" by Drew Smith, (Genealogical Computing, Spring 1997, Vol. 17, No. 1)

http://www.ancestry.com/library/view/gencomp/2785.asp


This page was created by Timothy N. West and is copyrighted by him. All rights reserved.